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DMUs in cloud sales are changing, is your sales force changing?

DMUs in cloud sales are changing, is your sales force changing?

From technical, to emotional; learn to speak their language Business leaders (CEOs) are responsible for buying 75% of cloud products, and are in most cases technically illiterate (Osborne, 2015). This means that IT-solution providers are dealing with a new decision maker. Over the past years I have spoken to hundreds of IT-solution providers and I noticed a difference between the successful companies and the companies who might not be there in a couple of years. The biggest difference is the way sales teams communicate. The successful companies focus their communication on the humans who have to work with it, as opposed to only speaking about technologies. The companies which are struggling to keep up often talk to customers in technical terms. As the decision unit is changing and there is more pressure from software vendors it is important for the sales force to learn more about their new target audience. How to communicate with non-techies? It will be important for the IT-providers sales team to change their game and communication style to level with the (technically illiterate) business leaders. The figure below shows the biggest differences between business leaders (e.g. CEOs) and technical leaders (e.g. IT managers or CTOs). Their interests differ and this is something to keep in mind during the entire sales process. An advantage can be create when demonstrating cloud products to CEOs, as they tend to focus on productivity and innovation power for the short term. Demonstrating the solution while highlighting the short term benefits can influence their opinion. Whereas the technial leader is process driven and focuses on the technical aspects of the implementation and security of the solution. While demonstrating the cloud solution to technical leaders, they... read more
The arrival of free products part 2/9

The arrival of free products part 2/9

‘Pay for software? Only if I can’t download it. Pay for a movie? Never. Pay for music? You must be from before 1998 (a.k.a. pre-Napster, explanation will follow).’ This would be the answers you’d get a few years ago. But thanks to the creativity (and urgency) these industries developed new business models, allowing them to generate revenue again. But before jumping to the actors that influence business models, I would like to show the effects of Free products on the behaviour of consumers. Music labels collapse ‘All my classmates in high school spoke about the new Eminem album which wasn’t even released yet in the Netherlands –the country in which I grew up- . I couldn’t wait to get home. As soon as I got home I would open Napster, search Eminem and after thirty minutes it was there, I could finally hear what my classmates spoke of, and I loved it.” From 1998 music labels started to “collapse”. The arrival of illegal downloads hit the CD sales drastically (O’Dell, 2011). The music industry decided to invest millions of dollars in court cases to stop the file sharing service which spread their music; Napster (Pequeno, 2010). But consumers didn’t care, even when the governments implemented laws making downloading music illegal, people would still download music. Why does everyone violate these laws? Downloading music is illegal in most countries for a while now, but why do people still do this? Are people not willing to pay for music, or is it the ease and the habit which was created over the years? One of the four biggest record labels, EMI... read more
The role of Marketing part 1/9

The role of Marketing part 1/9

On a Thursday evening I enter the supermarket. I collect my groceries and scan them with my lenses, I walk past the crowded shop shelves as I walk towards the check-out. My watch shows that I paid while I walk to my car. When I reach my car the trunk opens and I put my groceries in. While my car drives me home I watch the news on my cars windscreen. “They found a self-learning robot which escaped a testing facility three months ago, and discovered that it had duplicated itself using an abandoned car factory in Detroit.” This is the future, or at least how I see it. Over the years we have seen the effects of technological developments on the music, film and software industry. These industries have reshaped and during the transformation big companies have fallen and risen. Using examples from these industries I’d like to share my vision on the role of marketers from now till 2025. I’d like to discuss if it is technology that affects behaviour or if it is the behaviour of consumers that affects technology. My main question is, what will a marketer do in a world in which people gather everything they need for themselves, using 3D printers or the uprising sharing economy? Mark Grasmayer: This story will be continued in the following 8 blog posts and then I’ll make it available as an e-book with nice visuals, interviews with experts from different markets and other... read more
Why?

Why?

  What’s all this fuzz about? I believe one man can beat entire marketing armies from big corporate businesses by using technology and all the free knowledge that is accessible on the webz. I’m in the mid of this journey myself working at a software company who developed a very neat looking workspace in which you can do all your work (check out the simplicity: Workspace 365). But this blog will not be just about how we concurred the Netherlands & Europe with our product (and yet in progress, the rest of the world). No, it will be about becoming a tech-marketeer. I’ll share tricks, links and stuff I think are important while becoming a one man marketing army! Feel free to contact me or sign-up on the right (a... read more